Institut für Archäologische Wissenschaften

Vorderasiatische Archäologie

M.A. Selim Yıldız

Doktorand, ESKAS-Stipendiat

Vorderasiatische Archäologie

E-Mail
selim.yildiz@iaw.unibe.ch
Büro
080
Postadresse
Mittelstrasse 43
3012 Bern

SETTLEMENT IN SMOOTH CILICIA (CILICIA PEDIAS)

FROM THE ACHAEMENID PERSIAN PERIOD THROUGH THE LATE ROMAN PERIOD SELİM YILDIZ

The region known as “Cilicia” in antiquity, a very fertile land located at the interface between Syria, Cyprus, and Anatolia, has a long history from the prehistoric ages through the medieval period. This dissertation aims to understand how the character of settlement and urbanism developed and changed in Cilicia over a long period of 1200 years, from Achaemenid Persian control (550-320 BC) through the Hellenistic (320-50 BC) and Roman periods (to the 7th century AD). Until recently, these periods were rarely the primary focus of archaeological studies in Cilicia. Researchers working in the multi-period sites were usually motivated to learn more about the earlier periods. Consequently, the Achaemenid Persian, Hellenistic, and Roman Periods were ignored or not studied thoroughly. Thanks to recent excavations and new discoveries in Cilicia (such as Sirkeli, Kinet, Tarsus, Tatarlı, Soli-Pompeiopolis), it has now become possible to examine these periods. By focusing mainly on the multi-period settlements like mounds -in which changes and developments are better observed in stratified context, this project intends to understand the nature of the Cilician settlements during the above-mentioned time span in a multi-disciplinary holistic perspective. Taking up a regional approach, this study will help to determine the settlement patterns during such a long-time span and the effects of geographical features and political events on settlements. The archaeological remains and finds from the settlements, will be analyzed and compared typologically in order to see the changes in the material culture. The stratification of the settlements will be studied to clarify the chronological problems in dating artifacts.